PTSD Help for Veterans and Active Duty Troops

Note: This post was originally published June 27, 2012 in honor of PTSD Awareness Day. It has become one of my most visited posts, so I’ll be continually updating it and the resource list at the bottom

PTSD is almost a buzz word for my generation. Public understanding of the disorder is hugely important to reduce the negative stigma surrounding it and to further research into treatment options. Many people with diverse backgrounds are suffering from PTSD, but my reason for posting is to reach out to veterans, active duty or not, who are not seeking help. Just a few of the things I’ve heard from soldiers relating to combat stress: they “don’t believe in PTSD,” “PTSD just means you’re weak,” or they believe that seeking treatment will ruin their military career.

Enduring FreedomImage Credit: The U.S. Army

Men and women in uniform today are not ignorant about PTSD: Nightmares, heavy drinking, avoidance of things that remind you of combat, hyperarousal. Most combat vets will experience at least a couple of these symptoms while readjusting to life at home. A smaller percentage of them will continue experiencing them for a long time.

Still there remains an overwhelming attitude in the military community that only the weak cannot “just deal” with the trauma of combat, or even that psychology is fake and PTSD isn’t real. Ladies and Gentlemen, that is denial. It isn’t just saying, “I don’t have PTSD. That’s something other people have.” It is flat out denying the existence of the disorder. Statistics suggest most combat vets will not develop PTSD. All the better reason to be a support instead of a hurdle for your peers who do.  If you do one thing, stop perpetuating this lie. Your brothers and sisters in arms are taking their own lives at an alarming rate. Encourage them to get help. Support them. They need you.

A common reason that active duty service members don’t seek treatment is fear that it will ruin their military career. In a very uncertain economic time, service members may feel they must hide how they’re feeling and push forward to retain their career, particularly when they are concerned their counseling notes will be shared with their chain of command. If you need help and are concerned that seeking treatment or being honest in treatment will affect your military career, there are FREE, completely confidential counseling services available to you that are not military-connected and will not report anything to anyone. They are sometimes hard to find. Some of the more well-known ones may turn you away. Keep pushing. Keep trying.

Not Alone (now known as Courage Beyond) is an excellent resource. “Not Alone provides programs, resources and services to warriors and families impacted by combat stress and PTSD through a confidential and anonymous community.” They have a crisis hotline, personal stories and blogs, videos, and a very active online community. They offer “e-clinics,” online groups and FREE, in-person, confidential counseling in 17 states. At Ease (available only in Nebraska), do not even require your real name just to ensure your privacy in the hope that you will seek treatment and start living a happier, healthier life. You can also call 1-877-WAR-VETS 24/7 to talk with a combat veteran who has been there.

Ignoring your own PTSD symptoms makes you a ticking time bomb. Think you can “suck it up” and it won’t affect anyone else? You’re wrong. Effects of your PTSD on your spouse — discusses issues like not being able to show affection to your spouse and parenting problems. How your PTSD may effect your child — this includes items like avoiding activities with your child or avoiding being affectionate, as well as children mimicking PTSD symptoms and a high rate of depression and anxiety.

AboutFace is a collection of personal interview videos with veterans who volunteered to talk about their PTSD. They are men and women from all branches who served in different wars. They all answer the following in their videos: How I knew I had PTSD, How PTSD affects the people you love, Why I didn’t ask for help right away, When I knew I needed help, What treatment was like for me, How treatment helps me, and My advice to you. One that really struck me was Damien Holmes explaining how memory loss is the primary reason he sought treatment — simple things, like forgetting where he put his keys.

You know that smell that brings you back? That antsy feeling you get when you’re in a crowd and one more person just bumped into you? That sound that snaps all your senses to attention? Feel like the world doesn’t make sense or the things you used to believe in don’t matter? Your symptoms do not have to be the worst case scenario for them to affect your quality of life (and that of the people who love you). Even if your life has not spiraled completely out of control, it can be better. You deserve better. You deserve help. You deserve life.

If you’re seeking information on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as they relate/overlap, this is a good starting point.

Video: “When our veterans return from serving our country, let’s make sure our country is ready to serve them.” (Now 22 veterans are taking their own lives every day #22NeedU )

More FREE resources (feel free to post in the comments and I’ll add here):

Restore Warriors is a Web-based tool created by the Wounded Warrior Project. It’s packed with self-help tools for PTSD, combat stress, depression, and other invisible injuries. You’ll find so much information here to help you. Take your time looking around this site.

Military Pathways Mental Health Screening: It’s completely free, online, and will give you results, recommendations and resources immediately. No need to sign up for anything.

Veterans Crisis Line: Call, Chat, or Text. If you’re uncomfortable talking to someone over the phone, try the chat feature.

Real Warriors: Mostly self-help articles about resiliency, but also features a live chat option

After Deployment: Helpful information about PTSD, TBI, financial stress, physical injuries, military sexual trauma, and many other important topics.

Apps for coping, such as BioZen (a biofeedback app), LifeArmor, Breath2Relax and more. Check these out. There are some really good ones.

Stop Soldier Suicide has grown into an excellent place to get help. It’s an organization run by veterans for veterans. Not only can they help you get healthy, you can start a local chapter in your town, too.

Make the Connection has some personal stories from vets dealing with PTSD, plus self-help and other resources like free health screenings.

This post was last updated September 2014.

Click, Click. Photography Keeps Me Mindful.

Photography is my favorite hobby. Viewing the world around me with a photographer’s eye is a mindful practice that not only brings me joy, but helps me cope with anxiety, too. I focus not just on the way things appear, but on the way they exist in the world and how we affect each other.

I am especially interested in landscapes, nature, and the way elements in everyday life can come together in a beautiful way, whether one dying flower in a field of living ones or a pile of toys of my floor. Considering these things gives me context and perspective, especially at times when when mine isn’t quite working right. I frequently cart my camera around to events I know will bring on anxious feelings.

Anxiety tries to force us to pay attention to it, to feed it, and to ignore everything else. This way of refocusing, leveraging a hobby I love so much, has been so beautifully helpful for me. I’d love to hear from you about what photography means to you or how you’ve developed mindful practices to deal with anxiety. I know I’m not the only anxious photographer out there.

Check out more of my photography and connect with me on Flickr.

Flying into the Sun

Sweater Weather Roundup!

It’s been a while since I did a cover song post. I can’t imagine living life without music. When I find a song I love, I still rock it on repeat like a teenager. Being a writer and bibliophile means I’m especially attracted to exceptional lyrics. Regardless of the genre, if a song has words I love, I’ll buy it.  Sweater Weather by  alt-rockers The Neighbourhood doesn’t take a serious critical reading to appreciate. The single blew up in the summer of 2013, reaching number one on the Billboard Alternative Chart. Several months down from that success, YouTube is swimming in interesting, lovely, entertaining, silly, or otherwise noteworthy cover versions of Sweater Weather.

Ms. Alessia, YouTube user alealeluia, puts a little pep in it:

Titus and Kelsey Karter with a folksy soulful rendition:

Not technically a cover, but this video by actor and filmmaker Steeven Schlappkohl is a dramatic ASL signing of the lyrics set to the original track. Watch it.

Locustgarden stripped down cover:

Of course, no cover roundup would be complete without Postmodern Jukebox:

Check out my Thrift Shop Roundup!

Photography: Little Pink Houses

IMG_4354 by dianadoherty
IMG_4354, a photo by dianadoherty on Flickr.

I spent the day photographing C’s artwork so far from Preschool so I can make  a photobook at the end of the year. I just love the way these shots came out!
I am a creative person. I’ve always enjoyed crafting, drawing, writing, and just getting creative in general. C really isn’t into that stuff. Despite the loads of art and craft supplies we have,. an easel, and lots of projects planned by mommy, he’d rather be building stuff or creating complex “machines” and “robot guys” out of bits and pieces of other toys. So when he chooses to engage in kid crafts and art-making, I cherish it. Though I admit that I absolutely love the machines he makes and the stories that go with them.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/halahblue/12955819933/

Photography: First Sparkler

IMG_0677-12 by dianadoherty
IMG_0677-12, a photo by dianadoherty on Flickr.

Check Out Contently Freelancer Portfolios

Most of you know I’m a freelance writer. Generally, I stick to web content, like blog posts and infographics. I drink the SEO Kool-Aid. A lot of my work published online is ghostwritten, so I haven’t needed a good place to keep clips until I started publishing with a byline more often. Back when I went to college for English (not even ten years ago), many writers still collected paper clips. Paper.

In Web 2.0 times, writers could choose to keep just a list of links to send to potential clients. It’s helpful to keep one in a file somewhere. But I wanted a pretty place to keep my clips that wasn’t this blog. I wanted the work to be displayed in an aesthetically pleasing way that would feel like scanning through a book of clips but, you know, digital.

That’s when I found Contently.

We created Contently because we saw the world of publishing changing around us. In the midst of the disruption of traditional journalism, digital advertising and social media, the world economy was in a slump, causing throngs of talented journalists and creative storytellers to strike out on their own as freelancers – and not necessarily by choice.

ContentlyScre

Contently’s original manifesto from 2011 talked about how quality trumps quantity, how the internet was becoming a trash heap filled with “content,” and that we would soon see the death of content farms. (I’m paraphrasing.) The 2013 manifesto mentions that, yeah, that’s pretty much accurate. Those content mills paying pennies for blog posts seem to be in their death throes.

As I build my expertise in certain areas, Contently provides a platform to keep and display my clips that is nice to look at and simple to share. While I can’t speak for Contently for Brands, Contently for Journalists fits the bill exactly.

Want to see my clips? Where do you keep your writing clips or your freelance portfolio in any industry?

Things to Mail

We’re a military family. We move every couple of years, (maybe not anymore?), and both my extended family and my husband’s are sprinkled across the United States, most on the coasts and corners. Besides our little C, I have a niece on one side of the fam and a nephew on the other, both under age 10. We love them bunches, but don’t get to see them very often. In my best effort to keep a special connection with them both, I like to send them little things in the mail. Yes, even in this digital age, kids still love getting something in the mailbox. Heck, so do I! Plus, even though we Skype and talk on the phone sometimes, there is something distinctly special and meaningful about getting a little something in the mail. It says, I was thinking about and missing you so much, that I got this special thing just to send to you. From my hands to yours.

But…mailing presents is pretty expensive these days, so mostly I like to send cards or small things. We sometimes pick out funny cards at the store or make our own. We’ve bought some neat handmade postcards and hand-painted some together. We even sent nana and papa a hug in the mail.

2611413692_30d6db4aa1_z
Image Credit: Karen

In the United States, mail weighing under 13 ounces can be sent with just stamps and dropped in a blue mailbox. I’ve found so many great blog posts and Pinterest boards with ideas for super sweet mail under 13 ounces. The Giver’s Log even has an awesome Flikr pool for everyone’s “13 ounces or less” mail. Also, I’ve gathered together ideas for things you can pop in an envelope and mail off, like the hug. You can find the ideas I’m collecting on my own Pinterest board, Nifty 13 Ounce Mail.

Besides the recipient, fun things in the mail just might make your mail carrier smile, too. Now that your wheels are turning, what do you think you might want to send and who will the special recipient be?